People in Charlottesville, Virginia want Confederate symbols banned in the school district's dress code

FILE PHOTO: Members of the Ku Klux Klan face counter-protesters as they rally in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. on July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

  • The Hate-Free Schools Coalition has been pushing to ban Confederate symbols from school dress codes in Charlottesville, Virginia. 
  • The request for the ban comes a year after a white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville turned violent, resulting in the death of Heather Heyer.
  • The draft of the new dress code suggested banning Confederate, Ku Klux Klan and Nazi symbols.

An anti-hate group in Charlottesville is trying to ban Confederate symbols from the school district’s dress code.

The Hate-Free Schools Coalition has been pushing for a dress code change in Virginia’s Albemarle County in hopes of creating a safe and equal learning environment, according to The Daily Progress.

The request for the ban comes a year after a white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville turned violent, resulting in the death of Heather Heyer, who was killed when a driver plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters.

A draft of the new dress code suggests banning Confederate, Ku Klux Klan and Nazi symbols.

The Charlottesville School Board on Thursday expressed a willingness to change the dress code and ban such symbols.

Albemarle County officials previously denied including the ban, saying it could violate students‘ First Amendment rights.

The board will be meeting again next month to again discuss policy changes and has invited the Hate-Free Schools Coalition to the  meeting.

Superintendent Rosa Atkins told The Daily Progress she hopes to get other school boards to support the ban.

„I too would agree that there are symbols that evoke fear in adults and in children and we are at a place in our country now where the incidents of violence have increased significantly,“ she said.

Board member Sherry Kraft said after Thursday’s meeting that symbols „have meaning and affect us.“

„As a person of Jewish heritage I know seeing swastikas really affects me an throws me off, and I think that’s true of our students, too.“

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: How a black cop infiltrated the KKK — the true story behind Spike Lee’s ‚BlacKkKlansman‘

Source: Business insider

Kommentar verfassen