'The United States is better. For everything': Emotional photos and stories show what it's like for the migrants who have walked thousands of miles to seek asylum in the US

caravan migrants

  • About 7,000 Central Americans have fled their crime-ridden and violent homelands in the Northern Triangle, the section south of Mexico where Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador are located, traveling northward in multiple caravans to the US border.
  • The unplanned caravan has become the largest of its kind.
  • Men, women, and children face rough conditions along their trek — sweltering heat, days walking 30-miles, and a lack of food and shelter are just some of the obstacles they face.
  • Here’s what it’s like for the migrants who have walked thousands of miles to seek asylum in the US.

About 7,000 Central Americans have fled their crime-ridden and violent homelands in the Northern Triangle for the US border in what has become the largest caravan to date.

Migrants in the Honduran city of San Pedro Sula first formed the unplanned northbound caravan on October 13. Others have fled from El Salvador and Guatemala to also embark on the 2,700-mile journey toward the United States.

Conditions along the way are not great — the heat is sweltering, the days are long, and food and shelter are not always readily available.

To prevent the caravan from growing too large in size, Mexico has offered the opportunity to claim asylum there instead of the US. But most migrants have rejected the proposal.

„The United States is better,“ Honduran migrant Glenda Escobar told Reuters. „For everything.“

Here’s what it’s like for migrants who have walked thousands of miles to seek asylum in the US.

Multiple caravans of Central American migrants 7,000-strong have traveled thousands of miles through Guatemala and Mexico to seek asylum in the United States.

Source: Business Insider

Mostly from Honduras and El Salvador, many caravan members fled their crime-ridden and poverty-stricken homelands in search of better lives.

Source: Business Insider

The first wave of the caravan set out of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, northward toward the United States on October 13.

Source: Business Insider

See the rest of the story at Business Insider
Source: Business insider

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